We are honored to be working with an academic advisory board of eight respected scholars, chosen with an eye to diversity of expertise and relevance of their research to the subjects, themes, and the time period addressed in UNLADYLIKE2020, including scholars of Asian American women's history, African American women's history, Jewish women’s history, Latina women's history, Native American women's history, Gay and Lesbian history, Progressive Era history, and the history of immigrant women.

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Michael Bronksi | Professor of Women, Gender & Sexuality, Harvard University

Michael Bronski is Professor of Practice in Media and Activism in Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality at Harvard University. He has been involved with LGBT politics since 1969 as an activist, writer, and independent scholar. Bronski is the author of many books including the award-winning A Queer History of the United States (Beacon Press, 2011), A Queer History of the United States for Young People (Beacon Press, 2019), Considering Hate: Violence, Goodness, and Justice in American Culture and Politics (2015), You Can Tell Just by Looking and 20 Other Myths about LGBT Life and People (Beacon Press, 2013), Culture Clash: The Making of Gay Sensibility (1984), The Pleasure Principle: Sex, Backlash and the Making of Gay Freedom (1998), and Pulp Friction: Uncovering the Golden Age of Gay Male Pulps (2003). He currently edits the Queer Action/Queer Ideas series for Beacon Press, and is at work on The World Turned Upside Down: The Queerness of Children’s Literature (Beacon Press, forthcoming, June 2020).

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Yong Chen | Professor of History, University of California - Irvine

Yong Chen is Professor of History at the University of California, Irvine and an expert in an expert in late 19th and 20th century Asian American social and cultural history. He is the author of Chinese San Francisco 1850-1943: A Transpacific Community (Stanford, 2000), The Chinese in San Francisco (Peking University Press, 2009), and Chop Suey, USA: The Rise of Chinese Food in America (Columbia University Press, 2014). Chen is also co-editor of New Perspectives on American History (Hebei People’s Publishing House, 2010) and a main contributor to Civil Rights in America: A Framework for Identifying Significant Sites for the National Park Service, authorized and funded by the U.S. Congress, and served on the National Historic Landmarks Committee of the National Park Service. He is also a regular contributor to an editorial column in World Journal, the largest Chinese newspaper in the U.S.

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Hasia Diner | Professor of American Jewish History, New York University

Hasia Diner is Professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University; Paul S. and Sylvia Steinberg Professor of American Jewish History; Director of the Goldstein-Goren Center for American Jewish History; and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of History. Diner's work is located at the intersection of American and Jewish history and focuses on the mutual impact of America and the Jews. Her publications include Her Works Praise Her: A History of Jewish Women in America from Colonial Times to the Present (Basic Books, 2002) and The Jews of the United States, 1654 to 2000 (University of California Press, 2004). Diner is also a scholar of Irish American women and the author of Erin’s Daughters in America: Irish Immigrant Women in the Nineteenth Century (John Hopkins University Press, 1983). Her most recent book examines peddling as a global Jewish immigration strategy in the modern period.

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Mary Jo Tippeconnic Fox | Research Professor of American Indian Studies, University of Arizona

Mary Jo Tippeconnic Fox, PhD is a Research Professor of American Indian Studies, and affiliate faculty in Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Arizona. She is Comanche/Cherokee and an enrolled member of the Comanche Nation of Oklahoma. Her scholarly activities are focused on historical and contemporary Native American women’s issues, American Indian Studies, and American Indian education with an emphasis on higher education. Fox co-edited Serving Native American Students in Higher Education, and is currently co-editing American Indian Studies Ph.D. Students Telling Their Stories.

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Cynthia E. Orozco | Professor of History and Humanities, Eastern New Mexico University - Ruidoso

Cynthia E. Orozco is Professor of History and Humanities at Eastern New Mexico University, Ruidoso. Orozco is a founder of the Chicana Caucus of the National Association for Chicano Studies and, as a graduate student at UCLA, helped to pioneer the development of Chicana Studies and Chicana History. She is the author of No Mexicans, Women, or Dogs Allowed: The Rise of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement (University of Texas at Austin, 2009) and No Ladies Allowed: Adela Sloss-Vento, Twentieth Century Mexican American Civil Rights Leader, Public Intellectual, and Feminist in Texas (University of Texas, forthcoming), and an associate editor of Latinas in the United States: An Historical Encyclopedia (Indiana University Press, 2006). Orozco contributed 80 articles on Mexican American history to the New Handbook of Texas for the Texas State Historical Association and is an adviser to a Texas women’s history encyclopedia.

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Stephanie J. Shaw | Professor of History, Women’s Studies, and Black Studies, Ohio State University

Stephanie J. Shaw is Professor of History, Women’s Studies, and Black Studies at Ohio State University.  She is the author of What a Woman Ought to Be and to Do: Black Professional Women Workers during the Jim Crow Era (University of Chicago Press, 1996), detailing the family, work, and community lives of black working women between about 1880 and 1955. Shaw also published W. E. B. Du Bois and The Souls of Black Folk (UNC Press, 2015), and is currently completing a book tentatively titled Grandmothers, Granny Women, and Old Aunts: Rethinking Slave Families and Communities in the Nineteenth Century South. She has held fellowships at the Carter G. Woodson Institute, Rice University (Mellon Visiting Professorship), The National Humanities Center, The Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and the Stanford Humanities Center.

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Karen Manners Smith | Professor Emerita of History, Emporia State University

Specializing in the history of American women, Smith taught a variety of courses while at Emporia including American Women's History, Introduction to Women's Studies, Advanced Women's Studies, and Readings in Women, Gender, and Ethnicity. Smith was the Director of Emporia’s Ethnic and Gender Studies Program from 2006 to 2013, and has written several books, including A Student Companion to the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (Oxford University Press, 2006) and New Paths to Power: American Women 1890-1920 (Oxford University Press, 1994). Smith’s academic career has been dedicated to Progressive Era women, with a concentration on the political and social changes that enabled women to gain increased power and agency

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Nancy C. Unger | Professor and Chair of History, Santa Clara University

Nancy C. Unger is Professor and Chair of History at Santa Clara University, specializing in women’s history, LGBTQ history, and the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. She is vice-president of the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, and is the author of two award-winning biographies about Progressive Era leadership: Fighting Bob La Follette: The Righteous Reformer (The University of North Carolina Press, 2000) and Belle La Follette: Progressive Era Reformer (Routledge, 2016). Her book Beyond Nature’s Housekeepers: American Women in Environmental History (Oxford University Press, 2012) was a California Book Award finalist. Unger co-edited A Companion to the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (Wiley-Blackwell, 2017) and served as book review editor for the Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era.